Credit Repair Company Faceoff: Lexington Law vs Skyblue Credit

Sky Blue and Lexington Law are both the best credit repair companies out there and rank in the top positions for the best credit repair companies.

If you have decided to choose one of these credit repair company for yourself, then pat yourself on the back because these are the best.

So, which one should you go for? Which one is better?

There is no such thing as being better, both credit repair companies are equally good in their own way. So, to help you out we have reviewed the services provided by both the companies and the various benefits and we have made a list of aspects so that you can choose correctly.

Price

When it comes to price, Sky Blue is the clear winner as it is cheaper and offers most of the services offered by Lexington Law at a lesser price.

You only have to pay an initial fee of $59 and monthly installments of $59 if you choose the Sky Blue company whereas, for Lexington Law, there are a number of packages with different pricing.

In Lexington, you will need to pay a starting fee of $99 and then a monthly installment of $54.95, $79.95 or $99.95 depending on your package.

If you want additional services like monthly credit reports, then you would need to pay extra $14.95 in Sky blue and extra $10 in Lexington Law. Both offer you 50% discount for your partner. Overall, Sky Blue is cheaper than Lexington but Lexington only prices high because it offers you additional services, so check the services before you decide.

Services

Although Sky Blue Company doesn’t use online tools to help you with your credit report, they are known to get the work done quickly and efficiently and sends customized dispute letters to emphasize your issue.

They fix all the mistakes in your credit report and discover all the loopholes to your credit report in order to boost your score. They take up 15 issues at a time and get them corrected as soon as possible with efficient means.

Lexington Law includes a lot of features but it all depends on the package you choose. The most basic package just includes disputing incorrect information and provides you online access too. One of the best services which is offered by this company is to check whether the lender is following by FTC rules or not, if not then they ask them to remove the information from your report.

Lexington Law is the clear winner in case of services as it offers a lot of services at a low cost and is the best way to get your score improved in no time.

Support

Sky Blue company offers your support via email or telephone and are provided with all the answers which they want quickly. The customer service person is polite and always ready to help the customers and never pressurizes them to sign up for more services unlike, other repair companies.

Lexington Law also offers good support to its customers by assigning them a paralegal who answers all their questions and is available at all time for assistance.

Lexington Law again wins in the support area because it has professionals helping the customer and has a longer support hour than the Sky blue company.

Reliability

Sky blue credit company has been given an A+ rating from BBB and offers a money back guarantee if the customer is not satisfied with the services in the initial 90 days. It has a good reputation over its 25+ years of service and is known to get your work done with good and intelligent methods.

Lexington Law is no less, it has been given a B+ rating from BBB and while it doesn’t offer a money back guarantee as the Sky blue company, it does take payment for its services only once they are completed so you never have to pay for services which were never rendered.

Both the companies are reliable and won’t dupe you so you can easily choose whichever company you wish to choose and relax as these companies take care of your credit score.

The 1040 You’ll Never See

This just appear at http://www.counterpunch.org/

The 1040 You’ll Never See

Filing Status—Huge

Agriculture—My golf courses receive tax breaks for agricultural use. If a goat craps on your New Jersey property you can be designated a working farm. Hey, we’re real farmers at Trump Golf. We raise greens fees. Ha! Our government is so stupid.

Health savings account deduction—Can we talk about Obamacare? It’s a disaster. It makes me sick. (Hmm, good one!)

Student loan interest deduction—I went to the best college in America. Ask anyone. Go on, ask them. I can wait.

Domestic production activities deduction—What the fuck is this? Oh, you get it for building things? I used to do that. Never mind.

Other taxable income—I don’t know what gets into the heads of these stupid, foul-smelling foreign leeches, but visiting dignitaries keep bringing me livestock. Don’t they know I live on Fifth Avenue and not in the freakin’ Congo? My accountant says I have to count the 16 goats and 11 oxen as “tip” income. Me, tip income. Really. Okay, you blood suckers–$14,400 (All I know is that when I visit France as president the gift I’m bringing is soap.)

Adjusted gross income–$400,014,400

Nontaxable combat pay election—Yeah it’s real and I’m using it because I took heavy incoming from Ted Cruz—Lyin’ Ted, I call him Lyin’ Ted ‘cause he lies like a dog, only now he’s more like Cryin’ Ted or Goodbye-in’ Ted. And speaking of combat, which I feel I endured at military school, definitely worse than what most people saw in Nam, I want to remind you I love our vets. And I will take care of our vets, our vets who were never captured, our military school vets, even though I’ve done diddly for them so far, but I will someday, if I can get someone to pay for it. Still, I’m very proud to have made it through military school without getting captured. It was an honor.

Itemized deductions

Landscaping and hair care; mulch; hairspray; shellac; clementine/persimmon Spray Tan–$14,000,000

Briefing papers–$6

Corporate filing fees to pretend Trump Steaks still exists–$1,200

Subscriptions (National Enquirer; ConspiracyConspiracy DailyConspiracy WeeklyDaily ConspiracyConspiracy MonthlyTreacheryINtrigue; Loose Canon; Paranoia: The Conspiracy Reader; Collusion; PlotsYou Could Just PlotzTreason, Perfidy and Sedition OnlineThe Grassy KnollWingnut WeeklyThe Great White WayTruther Dare, etc.)–$1,800

Endangered Livestock Recovery Act (deduction for caring for rare breed of tailless oxen)–$100,000

Public relations (payments to John Miller; John Barron; Barron Miller; Miller Barron; Baron von Miller; Baron von Barron; Baron, Miller, Barron, Miller, Miller, Barrin and Lefkowitz)–$26,000,000

Ethnic Eviction and Rent Roll Cleansing Services (“You Choose ‘Em, We Lose ‘Em”)–$12,000,000

Acquisition of black friends–$8,450,000

Acquisition of Hispanic friends—(“I love the Hispanics.”)–$9,545,000

Say Hey Asians!–$350,000

Entertainment (Hangin’ with the Homies Night, Taco Bowl Night, Groovin’ with the Greeks, Swingin’ with the Serbs, Czech Mates, The Pole Dance, etc.)–$51,000,000

Legal fees (to defend the good name of Trump University, the second-best school in the United States, if it were open)–$44,000,000

BooksMy Rise and Fall by Benito Mussolini (first half much more enjoyable than second half) and 9-11 Descent Into Tyranny: The New World Order’s Dark Plans to Turn Earth into a Prison Planet by Alex Jones (Jones, who has proven that Michelle Obama is transgender and murdered Joan Rivers to keep her secret, is a master of trenchant understatement)–$38 paid to noted tax-evader and pissant press lord Jeff Bezos, who’s gonna fall like Humpty-Dumpty—with a nice push from Trumpty-Dumpty—mark my words. With me as president the first amendment will be the Second Amendment.

Non-cash charitable contributions (Regifted goats after they were rebranded.)–$4,000,000; Surplus guacamole from Taco Bowl Night–$3,750,000; Eleven surgically-removed oxtails given to Jamaican Cultural Festival in Brooklyn ($55,000, including fee for veterinarian); signed briefing papers to Wharton School ($5,000,000); goat semen to Brigham Young School of Animal Husbandry ($2,000,000; Collecting the semen was an honor. And, may I say, is anyone better than the Mormons? I don’t think so. On Saturday, I always think latter-day.); 396 rounds of golf–$158,400; four rounds of golf given to my pioneering Golfing for Cripples program (I’m so proud to be a part of this wonderful charity, so honored)–$1,600; 12 rounds of golf with me (Oh, gee, what do you think that’s worth? I will take a stab at it and figure each round would come to, say, $16,299,285.17)–$195,591,422.

Cash contributions to charity—Well, you got me. The answer is zippo. A big nothingburger, the proverbial goose egg. Way I see it, I give of myself, which is much more valuable than mere money. Lots of people have money, and there are so many billionaires who will give a sackful of cash just to see their name up in big letters on a building (what’s with that?), but who else can give ME? I transcend cash. read more

Our first book review on Amazon

Our first review was posted on Amazon today, I have re-posted it here for your enjoyment:

=&0=& Four Score and Seven by Andrew Feinberg introduces the judgment and conscience of Abraham Lincoln into 2016, as Abe returns from beyond to find himself ensconced in an educated family that is motivated to help him on his quest to improve the world he finds 150 years after leaving it rather unexpectedly.Feinberg, a journalist, has a discerning eye for satire and deep, likable characters (and a few that, by design, you won’t like), drawing freely, but fairly, from history, the Bible, Shakespeare, several of Lincoln’s speeches, and his own wit and imagination.

The book reads as easily as a comedy and, while it is that, it also is much more. Not far below the surface, this skillful fusion of history, politics, religion and time travel cleverly takes on, with satire coupled with thought-provoking reality, issues that matter now, including historical and (what passes for) presidential politics in 2016, the dysfunctional American political system, climate change, religion, individual freedom and more.

Four Score and Seven will leave you laughing, but it also will leave you thinking, not just about Feinberg’s easy marriage of the past and the present, but also about the future, your future, before and when you cast your ballot in November.